Growth Mindset Resources

Books:

Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol Dweck

“With the right mindset, we can motivate our kids and help them to raise their grades, as well as reach our own goals–personal and professional. Dweck reveals what all great parents, teachers, CEOs, and athletes already know: how a simple idea about the brain can create a love of learning and a resilience that is the basis of great accomplishment in every area.”

 

Ungifted — Intelligence Redefined: The Truth About Talent, Practice, Creativity, and the Many Paths to Greatness by Scott Barry Kaufman (2013)

The chapters on Mindset, Self-Regulation, Deliberate Practice, and Talent are particularly relevant. The book is an accessible and informative read that consolidates the latest research. Recommended to all people starting out their research on grit and growth mindsets.

 

Punished by Rewards: The Trouble with Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A’s, Praise, and Other Bribes by Alfie Kohn

 

“The basic strategy we use for raising children, teaching students, and managing workers can be summarized in six words: Do this and you’ll get that. We dangle goodies (from candy bars to sales commissions) in front of people in much the same way we train the family pet. Drawing on a wealth of psychological research, Alfie Kohn points the way to a more successful strategy based on working with people instead of doing things to them. “Do rewards motivate people?” asks Kohn. “Yes. They motivate people to get rewards.” Seasoned with humor and familiar examples, Punished By Rewards presents an argument unsettling to hear but impossible to dismiss.”

 

 

 

 

PRINT ARTICLES – NON-RESEARCH

Mindset Online

http://mindsetonline.com

An online compendium of resources, research, and teaching tools about mindsets, located in one accessible website.

 

“Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives”

http://www.brainpickings.org/2014/01/29/carol-dweck-mindset/

“How to fine-tune the internal monologue that scores every aspect of our lives, from leadership to learning to love.”

 

“Helping Students Start the Year With a Positive Mindset”

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/helping-students-start-year-positive-mindset-maurice-elias

“For students who have had trouble in school, or who have had a negative summer, it is especially important to get the school year off to a fresh start. And for all students, having a positive mindset makes learning much more likely. Here are three activities to help accomplish these goals.”

 

“Stanford University’s Carol Dweck on the Growth Mindset and Education”

http://onedublin.org/2012/06/19/stanford-universitys-carol-dweck-on-the-growth-mindset-and-education/

 

“Making Friends With Failure”

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/learning-from-failure-ainissa-ramirez

“There is a major disconnect between schools and the real world on the notion of failure. School teaches us there is only one answer for every problem. And if we don’t get it, we are a failure. This dissuades students from trying — they fear failure. We need to teach students how to make friends with failure.”

 

“What’s Your Learning Disposition? How to Foster Students’ Mindsets”

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/03/whats-your-learning-disposition-how-to-foster-students-mindsets/

“Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck’s work on growth mindsets has dominated much of the attention around how students can influence their own learning. But there are other ways to help students tap into their own motivation, too. Here are a few other important mindsets to consider.”

 

“New Research: Students benefit from learning that intelligence is not fixed”

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/07/new-research-students-benefit-from-learning-that-intelligence-is-not-fixed/

“Teaching students that intelligence can grow and blossom with effort – rather than being a fixed trait they’re just born with – is gaining traction in progressive education circles. And new research from Stanford is helping to build the case that nurturing a growth mindset can help many kids understand their true potential.”

 

“Can Self-Compassion Overcome Procrastination?”

http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/can_self_compassion_overcome_procrastination

“Putting something off can trigger a downward negative spiral of fixed-minded habits. But a recent study suggests that being kind to yourself can help you achieve your goals.”

“How to Overcome an Immunity to Change”

http://experiencelife.com/article/how-to-overcome-immunity-to-change/

Two prominent Harvard teachers and researchers share a step-by-step plan that can help individuals break through old patterns, fixed mindsets, and finally make the shifts that matter.

 

[PRINT ARTICLES – RESEARCH]

Mindset Online

http://mindsetonline.com

An online compendium of resources, research, and teaching tools about mindsets, located in one accessible website.

 

[VIDEOS & LECTURES]

“Carol Dweck: A Study on Praise and Mindsets” [Youtube Video]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWv1VdDeoRY

A short but super informative and engaging video about Carol Dweck’s seminal research study on praise, motivation, and mindsets.

 

“Brene Brown: The Power of Vulnerability”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCvmsMzlF7o

Brené Brown studies human connection — our ability to empathize, belong, love. In a poignant, funny talk, she shares a deep insight from her research, one that sent her on a personal quest to know herself as well as to understand humanity. A talk to share.

 

“Brene Brown: Listening to Shame”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=psN1DORYYV0

Shame is an unspoken epidemic, the secret behind many forms of broken and fixed-minded behavior. Brené Brown, whose earlier talk on vulnerability became a viral hit, explores what can happen when people confront their shame head-on. Her own humor, humanity and vulnerability shine through every word.

 

 

Academic Mindsets as a Critical Component of Deeper Learning  

 

 

EEF Project:

 

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Portsmouth University is delivering the project, which will teach children about the importance of having a ‘growth mindset’. The project is based on the hypothesis that children who have a fixed mindset and believe that “I’m no good at this and never will be” do less well than those with a growth mindset and believe that “I can develop my ability in this subject and I can succeed”. It will test two models of changing the way pupils think about themselves and their intelligence. The first, most intensive model, will involve a nine-week course of support from university students and external agencies, including the local football club’s Study Centre and the Education Business Partnership. The second model is a simpler teacher training model, where teachers will be trained to teach pupils about the malleability of their intelligence (e.g. praising effort, rather than intelligence).

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